Does Girls’ Self-Efficacy Enhance Their Educational Attainment? Findings from a Conditional Cash Transfer Program Evaluation in North India

Priya Nanda, International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)
Priya Das, International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)
Lakshmi Gopalakrishnan, International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)
Nitin Datta, International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)
Pranita Achyut, International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)
Anurag Mishra, International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)

India has the largest proportion (46%) child brides. Poor levels of educational attainment for girls are both a cause and a consequence of child marriage. Data from evaluation of a conditional cash transfer program entitled Apni Beti Apna Dhan (ABAD) was analyzed with a sample size of 9, 466 girls age 14-18 years. We examined the effect of girls’ self-efficacy on their educational attainment. Multivariate analysis found that self-efficacy was a significant predictor of girls’ educational attainment. It remained a significant predictor even after controlling for other independent variables such as gender equitable attitude score (GEMS), knowledge of rights score and socio-economic status. Self-efficacy is particularly important in the context of girls in rural Haryana due to the many social and gender pressures that condition their ability to fulfil their own aspirations. Higher levels of self-efficacy may empower girls to negotiate these challenges to fulfil their educational aspirations.

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 Presented in Session P8. Economy, Labor Force, Education, and Inequality/Gender, Race and Ethnicity