Changes in Modern Contraceptive Use and Women’s Education in Nairobi Slums: Evidence from a Decomposition Model

Donatien Beguy, African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC)
Blessing Mberu, African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC)
Patricia Elungata, African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC)
Alex C. Ezeh, African Population and Health Research Center (APHRC)

In this paper, we examined change in modern CPR by education level among women aged 15-49 in urban slums in Nairobi, Kenya between 2000 and 2012 and whether this change is due to a change in the population structure or rather a change in reproductive behavior. We used unique DHS-type data collected in 2000 and 2012, and employed a decomposition model. Findings indicate a tremendous 20% increase in modern CPR between 2000 and 2012 in Nairobi slums. About 62% of the observed increase is due to a change in women’s reproductive behavior, which is consistent with findings from a recent study in about 27 SSA countries including Kenya. This is probably due to the revival of FP programs in Kenya over the past few years through targeted policies and programs. It seems that hitherto underserved segments of the population such as slum dwellers are being reached with FP services.

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 Presented in Session P9. Family Planning, Sexual Behavior, and Reproductive Health