Family Social and Economic Factors and Exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences

Teri Rosales, University of Michigan

Research suggests that family social and economic factors are associated with differential exposure to adverse childhood experiences. Yet our understanding of the role that social and economic stratification plays in shaping exposure to adverse childhood experiences is limited. This study documents the prevalence of exposure to adverse childhood experience in a nationally representative sample of youth, examines whether family social and economic factors shape variation in amount of exposure, and investigates how family social and economic factors shape variation in type of exposure. Results indicate that prevalence among youth is remarkably high and that amount of exposure varies by family social and economic factors. Additionally, the odds of exposure to adverse childhood experience were distinctly different for youth from families in the lowest income group (highest poverty) compared to youth from families that received welfare, highlighting important qualitative differences in the nature and influence of family social and economic factors.

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 Presented in Session P4. Children and Youth/Population and Aging